(Perm Req) An introduction to modern methods used in the detection, investigation and solution of crimes. Practical analysis of evidence in a crime laboratory, including fingerprints and other impressions, firearms ID and ballistics, hairs and fibers, document examination, and use of polygraph. This class is taught using a "blended learning" format divided equally with presentation of online recorded lectures, case studies, webcasts and readings; and practical examination of criminalistics procedures and evidence identification exercises in the CCJS Crime Laboratory. There are lab fees associated with this course.
Course Offerings:
    Fall 2019Instructor: Thomas P. MaurielloView: Syllabus
    Spring 2020Instructor: Thomas P. Mauriello
s course is designed to assist criminology and criminal justice students explore career opportunities. Topics will include: graduate school, law school, career opportunities in federal, state, local, and public agencies, resume writing, and intern
Course Offerings:
    Spring 2020Instructor: Nicole Jackson
A thorough and critical examination of family violence. Topics include the historical background to family violence, methods of studying this serious issue, elder abuse, child abuse, the cultural factors involved in intimate partner violence, violence in same-sex relationships, and the criminal justice response to family violence. Although the course focuses on the American family, illustrations from other cultures are provided
Course Offerings:
    Spring 2020Instructor: Nicole Romeiser
(Perm Req) Contact department for information to register for this course.
Course Offerings:
    Spring 2020Instructor: Nicole JacksonView: Syllabus
rm Req) Cybercrime research has grown in visibility and importance during the last two decades. Nevertheless, despite the growing public interest in cybercrime and its consequences for businesses and individuals, only scant attention has been given in the criminological discipline to investigation and understanding of this new type of crime. The purpose of this course is to introduce students with the technical, social and legal aspects of cybercrime as well as expose students to theories and tools that enable scientific exploration of this phenomenon. In the first few weeks of the semester we will learn about the computer and the internet, and discuss several definitions and typologies of cybercrime. Then we will discuss the hacker, the victim and the IT manger, review various theories of crime causation, and assess the relevance of these theories in the context of cyber space. We will then describe several technical tools that allow the collection of data from the Internet. We will conclude with a discussion on the legal issues affected and created by online
Course Offerings:
    Spring 2020Instructor: Unlisted/TBD
minar in Criminology and Criminal Justice; Evidence Based Pol
Course Offerings:
    Spring 2020Instructor: Alan Drew
inar in Criminology and Criminal Justice; Cross National Comparisons of Crime and Criminal J
Course Offerings:
    Fall 2019Instructor: Laszlo KorossyView: Syllabus
    Spring 2020Instructor: Bo Jiang
inar in Criminology and Criminal Justice; Causes and Consequences of Ter
Course Offerings:
    Spring 2020Instructor: Gary LaFree
The structuring of manpower, material, and systems to accomplish the major goals of social control. Personnel and systems management. Political controls and limitations on authority and jurisdiction.
Course Offerings:
    Fall 2019Instructor: Russell E. Hamill IIIView: Syllabus
    Spring 2020Instructor: Russell E. Hamill III
ected Topics in Criminology and Criminal Justice; Police and Campus Inter
Course Offerings:
    Spring 2020Instructor: Gary LaFree
lected Topics in Criminology and Criminal Justice; Crisis Management and Leadership for Public S
Course Offerings:
    Spring 2020Instructor: C. Thomas (Tom) Jordan
lected Topics in Criminology and Criminal Justice; Recruitment and Retention of Public Safety Professi
Course Offerings:
    Spring 2020Instructor: Shawn Eastman
ected Topics in Criminology and Criminal Justice; Crime M
Course Offerings:
    Spring 2020Instructor: Marcus Boyd
ected Topics in Criminology and Criminal Justice; Crossover Youth: The instersection of the Child Welfare System and Criminal Justice
Course Offerings:
ected Topics in Criminology and Criminal Justice; Navigating Your Future: Transforming Your Degree into a C
Course Offerings:
    Spring 2020Instructor: Richard Harris
mination of special research problems and techn
Course Offerings:
    Spring 2020Instructor: Min Xie
in-depth exploration of applied linear regression analysis. Covers characteristics of estimates, such as unbiasedness and efficiency. Encourages fluency with the theoretical issues involved in the basic linear regression using simple algebra, familiarity with the general model using matrix algebra, and fluency with the computer application of multivariate regressions and the probit/logit m
Course Offerings:
    Spring 2020Instructor: Unlisted/TBD
s course provides a general introduction to the study of the causes of crime from an interdisciplinary perspective. The central focus centers on the major theories of crime causation developed over the past two hundred years. Significant issues in criminology -- for example, the role of age, race, gender, and social class in crime causation as well as explanations of specific forms of crime such as violence and white collar crime -- are highlighted and discussed. In addition, special attention is devoted to the measurement of crime and what is known from the available empirical data on the nature and extent of crime in the United S
Course Offerings:
    Spring 2020Instructor: Jean McGloin
cial Criminological Problems; Punishment and Ineq
Course Offerings:
    Spring 2020Instructor: Wade Jacobsen
in-depth inventory of the methods of criminological research. It considers the philosophy of science and research ethics; discusses sampling, measurement and methods of data collection, including survey, experimental, evaluation, and qualitative resea
Course Offerings:
    Spring 2020Instructor: Lauren Porter
t (if anything) motivates an individual to commit acts of crime? Why is crime concentrated in a small number of communities? Why do some societies have high rates of crime and violence while others do not? What can the government do (if anything) to prevent and control crime? These questions have challenged and bedeviled social thinkers for centuries. Indeed, such big questions have no easy answers. This course seeks to engage students in a thoughtful, in-depth examination of the idea of crime. In this course, we will explore fundamental debates about the definition of crime, its nature, its explanation, and its control. Emphasis is placed on original readings and a critical appraisal of the major theoretical paradigms in the field of criminology. We will begin with controversies over the definition of crime and deviance. We then examine the nature of crime, including crime trends and patterns. Then we turn to different theories of crime and explore the underlying assumptions regarding human nature in the competing explanations and paradigms. For example, one major divide concerns theories that explain individual differences in crime rates versus those that explain societal or community-level differences. We will also explore the implications of criminological theory for understanding approaches to the prevention and control of
Course Offerings:
    Spring 2020Instructor: John LaubView: Syllabus